Goldendoodle Health Issues- What You Need to Know

Thank you for sharing.

Goldendoodle Health Issues and Diseases

Doctor | F1 Goldendoodle Puppy | Goldendoodle Health Issues- What You Need to Know | #goldendoodle #miniaturegoldendoodle #goldendoodles #miniaturegoldendoodles #goldendoodlepuppy #puppy #goldendoodlehealth #goldendoodlehealthissues
Photo by Mikhail Nilov 

Just as purebred dogs and humans have a genetic potential to inherit certain diseases, hybrid dogs have the same potential to develop genetic health problems. Although Goldendoodle health issues can be prevalent in all generations of Goldendoodles, some generations of Goldendoodles may be less prone to inheriting disease than others. In short, this means that with certain generations of Goldendoodles, genetic testing of the parents becomes very important. Generally, a first-generation Goldendoodle or an F1 will have what is referred to as Hybrid Vigor. Simply put, Hybrid Vigor means that the hybrid-mix is healthier than it’s purebred parents. In fact, Hybrid Vigor can result in increased disease resistance and longevity, which are traits valued in a companion dog, such as a Goldendoodle.

F1 Goldendoodle Puppy | Goldendoodle Health Issues- What You Need to Know | #goldendoodle #miniaturegoldendoodle #goldendoodles #miniaturegoldendoodles #goldendoodlepuppy #puppy #goldendoodlehealth #goldendoodlehealthissues
Juno – F1 Goldendoodle Puppy

Overall, Goldendoodles are a relatively healthy mix with a long lifespan. In fact, Goldendoodles tend to live anywhere from 10-15 years of age. By mixing a Poodle with a Golden Retriever, F1 Goldendoodles tend to have fewer breed-specific diseases than their parent breeds. In order to better understand Goldendoodle health issues, it helps to know more about the health concerns of the Poodle and Golden Retriever.

Poodle Health Concerns

  • Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s Disease) – This is the most common health concern in standard breeds. This affects the dog’s ability to produce enough hormones in the adrenal gland.
  • Hyperadrenocorticism (Cushing’s Disease) – An overproduction of cortisol.
  • Hip Dysplasia – Common in larger dogs, this is a hereditary disease that weakens the hip or elbow joints.
  • Epilepsy – Causes seizures.
  • Bloating and Gastric Dilatation Volvulus (GDV) – GDV or “bloat” is a potentially life threatening disease, as the stomach starts to twist and traps air inside.
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) and other eye diseases like Cataracts – PRA is a hereditary disease that has a progressive nature, as does cataracts. May lead to blindness.
  • Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism – Both affect the production of thyroid hormones, which regulate metabolism.
  • Hypoglycaemia in Puppies – A sudden drop in blood sugar. Usually with miniature breed puppies in the first four months of life.
  • Sebaceous Adenitis (SA) – A skin condition that causes dry, scaly skin. May lead to hair loss.
  • von Willebrand’s Disease (vWD) – A hereditary disease that causes problems with blood clotting and can cause extreme blood loss, even from small wounds.
  • Patellar Luxation – Results in a dislocated kneecap, which causes discomfort and limping. This problem is more common in toy and miniature breeds.
  • Legg-Calve-Perthes Disease (LCP Disease or LCPD) – A disorder of hip joints. Causes pain and muscle shrinkage. More common in smaller breeds.

Golden Retriever Health Concerns

  • Cancer – Sadly the highest rate of cancer happens with Golden Retrievers.
  • Skin Conditions – Due to their long, dense outer coat.
  • Chest Conditions – Concerns that affect lungs, heart, and circulatory system. Subvalvular aortic stenosis is common.
  • Patellar Luxation – Results in a dislocated kneecap, which causes discomfort and limping.
  • von Willebrand’s Disease (vWD) – A hereditary disease that causes problems with blood clotting and can cause extreme blood loss, even from small wounds.
  • Ear Infections – Due to their long hair and floppy ears, ear infections can be common.
  • Hypothyroidism and Hyperthyroidism – Both affect the production of thyroid hormones, which regulate metabolism.
  • Progressive Retinal Atrophy (PRA) and other eye diseases like Cataracts – PRA is a hereditary disease that has a progressive nature, as does cataracts. May lead to blindness
  • Hip Dysplasia – Common in larger dogs. A hereditary disease that weapons hip and elbow joints.

Goldendoodle Health Issues

Henceforth, being familiar with the health concerns of the Poodle and the Golden Retriever gives us insight into what concerns we may have with a Goldendoodle. Despite first-generation Goldendoodles being healthier than their parents, Goldendoodles can still be predisposed to any genetic diseases a parent may have. Goldendoodles are most prone to:

  • Hip dysplasia – Common in larger dogs. A hereditary disease that weapons hip and elbow joints.
  • Subvalvular aortic stenosis – A heart disease that is present at birth.
  • Sebaceous Adenitis (SA) –   A skin condition that causes dry, scaly skin. May lead to hair loss.
  • Hypoadrenocorticism (Addison’s Disease) – Affects a Goldendoodle’s ability to produce enough hormones in the adrenal gland.
  • Cataracts – Eye problems that can lead to poor vision or blindness.
  • Ear Infections – Due to their long hair and floppy ears, ear infections can be common.
  • Atopic Dermatitis – An inflammatory, chronic skin disease associated with allergies.
  • Epilepsy – Causes seizures.

Outside of genetic concerns, Goldendoodles are also prone to food and environmental allergies, ear infections, tear staining, and dental problems.

Goldendoodle Puppy wearing a vest| Goldendoodle Health Issues- What You Need to Know | #goldendoodle #miniaturegoldendoodle #goldendoodles #miniaturegoldendoodles #goldendoodlepuppy #puppy #goldendoodlehealth #goldendoodlehealthissues

Choosing a Healthy Goldendoodle

There is never a 100% guarantee that your Goldendoodle will be healthy its whole life and never suffer from a serious health issue, however, there are certain precautions one can take to have the best chance of getting a healthy Goldendoodle.

Firstly, it is important to know the health history of the parents. If a breeder is unwilling or unable to provide health-related documentation that shows the parents are free from health conditions known to both parent breeds, then use caution. Just because the parents are healthy at a vet check, does not guarantee that the pedigree is as disease-free as possible. A reputable and ethical breeder will be able to provide health documentation, offer a health guarantee, and will be honest and open about health problems in the Goldendoodle and the incidence with which they occur in its lines.

Health Certifications and Documentation to Obtain From the Breeder

  • Orthopedic Foundation for Animals (OFA) Certificate – to state that the parents do not have hip or elbow problems or any apparent heart issues
  • Canine Eye Registry Foundation – to state the parents’ eyes are healthy
  • DNA Test – for progressive retinal atrophy
Two Goldendoodle puppies F1 Goldendoodle Puppy | Goldendoodle Health Issues- What You Need to Know | #goldendoodle #miniaturegoldendoodle #goldendoodles #miniaturegoldendoodles #goldendoodlepuppy #puppy #goldendoodlehealth #goldendoodlehealthissues

Final Thoughts

Although there is no 100% guarantee that your Goldendoodle will not have any health problems, understanding the health of the purebred parents can help you to choose the best puppy for you. Alternatively, adopting an adult dog from a shelter can help you rule out potential Goldendoodle health issues, as most health concerns aren’t evident in puppies but can be ruled out with an adult dog. Adult or puppy, be sure to take your new pet to a veterinarian right away who can work with you on a preventative program to help keep your new Goldendoodle as healthy as possible.

Happy Tail Wags xo

Money can buy you a fine dog, but only love can make him wag his tail.

Kinky Friedman

Follow Juno on Social Media
Thank you for sharing.

Leave a Reply

This Post Has 9 Comments

  1. Beth

    This was very informative! I have a friend who loves Goldendoodles and will share this with her before she gets another. I think Goldendoodles are adorable and I would consider adopting an adult one in the future.

  2. jana rade

    Unfortunately, when you mix different breeds, you might eliminate their problems but the gene mingling, or double it. Or, if you’re lucky, somewhere inbetween.

  3. Ruth Epstein

    Great information and like any mixed breed they come with health issues. I have never bought a hybrid, only rescue but reading your post was very interesting especially as I do dog sit for a Golden Doodle occasionally and I know she is allergic to chicken.

  4. Terri

    Great detailed information about Golden Doodles. It gives those looking for a Golden Doodle a heads up to what they could encounter. My dog, Henry, we think is a Cockapoo. He’s a rescue. So, without a DNA test, it’s difficult to say for certain. However, he certainly has Poodle DNA. I think working with your vet and being on the lookout for what could occur is key in adopting an animal. You provided a great laundry list of what could be on the horizon and what to talk to the vet about for signs of those issues. Well done!

    1. Paula

      Thank you for your thoughtful reply. Say hi to Henry from us!!

  5. Dorothy "FiveSibesMom"

    Excellent post. I grew up with Poodles, as they were one of my Mom’s favorite breeds. We had four, and her one girl had Addison’s. She was told when she was young that her lifespan would be short. Fortunately, with medication and great care from my Mom, her Joy lived almost 15 years before she had to be helped across the Rainbow Bridge. She did have bouts of shakes, and meds made her so hungry, but my Mom rarely left her alone so she wouldn’t be stressed. All of her Poodles were just so wonderful! One of my Huskies had epilepsy, and another IBS issues…it is so good for people to be aware of other possibilities and be prepared to care for any dog, just in case. Pinning to share!

    1. Paula

      That’s so wonderful that Joy ended up having such a long and loving life. It sounds like your Mom gave her a beautiful life. Thanks for pinning!

  6. Nikki

    This is a great list of issues regarding both poodles and goldens. I feel like the hardest part of choosing a hybrid breed, just like a mixed breed is that you don’t know which combination of genes you may end up with (especially for recessive traits). But I think making sure both parents have undergone all their breed-specific testing is a really good starting point. I imagine as these dogs are bred more we will learn more about specific genetic testing that may be needed.

  7. Kamira Gayle

    What an informative read. I had no idea about the health issues concerning Goldendoodles. I agree it’s a good idea to check the health history and any medical records when adopting or taking in a rescue. Thanks for sharing this helpful information.